Pregnant mums encouraged to keep track of baby’s kicks

Expecting parents at University Hospital Wishaw get reminder ‘nurture ribbons’

Monday 1st July 2019

Pregnant mums and their partners at University Hospital Wishaw are being encouraged to keep track of their baby’s movements in the womb through a new initiative that sees nurses give out nurture ribbons as a reminder to think about their child’s kicks and bumps.

A baby’s first movements usually occur between 16 and 24 weeks of pregnancy and every baby’s pattern of movement will be different.

The nurture ribbons are intended to remind expecting parents to take time out of their day to think about their baby’s movement and to call triage immediately if there are any changes.

“When you first start to feel your baby move it can be anything from a flutter to a kick and the type of movement can change the further along you are in your pregnancy,” says Wendy Duffy, staff midwife at University Hospital Wishaw.

“We want to stress to expecting parents the importance of knowing the pattern of their baby’s movements and the nurture ribbons is a great way of doing that.

“It is small enough to be attached to a set of keys or to tie around your wrist and reminds you to stop and take a few minutes out of your day to think about your baby’s movement pattern.

“If at any time women experience a change in their pattern or have any concerns about their baby’s movement we strongly advise them to contact maternity triage immediately and not to wait.”

Maternity staff are also implementing a ‘teach back technique’ that involves asking patients to explain, in their own words, what healthcare staff have just discussed with them to ensure they fully understand.

Lorna Lennox, staff midwife at University Hospital Wishaw, said: “Clear communication is so important for effective healthcare relationships and for patient safety. The teach-back technique is an easy and effective way of doing this.

“When couples become pregnant they are given lots of information and it can sometimes be overwhelming when it comes to something as important as your baby’s movements.

“We want to ensure that new parents know what to look out for and are confident in recognising when something has changed, and know never to hesitate in contacting a midwife or maternity unit for advice.”

 

Pictured: staff midwives Wendy Duffy and Lorna Lennox