Tayside team pioneers new womb cancer surgery

Friday 5th July 2019

An NHS Tayside gynaecological team have been recognised for pioneering the use of keyhole surgery that significantly reduces the risk of complications on a type of cancer.

Endometrial or womb cancer affects one in three women in their lifetime and cases are on their rise.

Being overweight is one of the most significant risk factors for the condition, and being considerably overweight prevents doctors carrying out the usual treatment because of the risk associated with surgery.

As a result, the team, which includes surgical, anaesthetic and theatre staff, invested in training and equipment and are now offering keyhole hysterectomies to women with a BMI up to 60.

Complications are said to have reduced from one in four to one in ten.

Consultant gynaecologists Dr Wendy McMullen and Dr Kalpana Ragupathy said, “It is an honour to receive such a prestigious award in recognition of our team's hard work and innovative practice.  It has been a long, but steady journey developing the surgical package for safe management of women with endometrial cancer. Our many thanks to the Royal College of Physicians for the award.

“We would also like to convey our gratitude to the gynaecology management team who extended their support in transforming innovative ideas to reality and our patients for their continued trust that makes us work harder to provide better outcomes.”

Now, the team is working with a national cancer prevention network to raise awareness of the link between obesity and womb cancer.

Meanwhile, its clinical nurse specialists are working with clinical psychologists to help women with the disease lose weight before and after surgery.

 

An NHS Tayside gynaecological team have been recognised for pioneering the use of keyhole surgery on a type of cancer that significantly reduces the risk of complications.

Endometrial or womb cancer affects one in three women in their lifetime and cases are on their rise.

Being overweight is one of the most significant risk factors for the condition, and being considerably overweight prevents doctors carrying out the usual treatment because of the risk associated with surgery.

As a result, the team, which includes surgical, anaesthetic and theatre staff, invested in training and equipment and are now offering keyhole hysterectomies to women with a BMI up to 60.

Complications are said to have reduced from one in four to one in ten.

Consultant gynaecologists Dr Wendy McMullen and Dr Kalpana Ragupathy said, “It is an honour to receive such a prestigious award in recognition of our team's hard work and innovative practice.  It has been a long, but steady journey developing the surgical package for safe management of women with endometrial cancer. Our many thanks to the Royal College of Physicians for the award.

“We would also like to convey our gratitude to the gynaecology management team who extended their support in transforming innovative ideas to reality and our patients for their continued trust that makes us work harder to provide better outcomes.”

Now, the team is working with a national cancer prevention network to raise awareness of the link between obesity and womb cancer.

Meanwhile, its clinical nurse specialists are working with clinical psychologists to help women with the disease lose weight before and after surgery.  

 

 

Pictured: anaesthetic nurse Susan Turner, consultant gynaecologists Dr Wendy McMullen and Dr Kalpana Ragupathy, senior nurse for gynaecology services Daisy Brand, theatre charge nurse Jenny Gray and Eddie Wilson with their Cullen Award.